Books I have read and recommend.

Saturday, January 19, 2013

PERRY SWISS: Ready For Action.

 Hi Guys
Well, you may recall I was working on some Swiss Infantry for my Napoleonic French Army in 28mm.
These guys here are all PERRY Plastics.
Well, I've finally finished basing them and my first Battalion is ready to go.
I have given them a Colour (Flag) from a French Line Regiment, so I will have to replace that with the appropriate "Swiss' color eventually but for now I hope no one will notice.
These chaps are painted as the 4th Regiment.
I've based them 50mm wide x 40mm deep. This is my preferred base size for Infantry.
The Perry Plastic Infantry are very nice sculpts (as you would expect from the PERRYs) and easy to assemble.
Enjoy!










As usual. comments are welcomed.
Cheers

Westfalia Miniatures Review

Hi Guys
I recently placed an order with the guys at Westfalia Miniatures. I ordered some Rude Highlanders, (a pair of miniature), a set of eight Hanovarian Kiemannsegges Jaegers, a set of three French Engineers in body armour and a set of four Prussian Medical staff.
Lets have a look at the Highlanders first I think:
 They are called 'Rude' Highlanders and they certainly are that. Both miniatures are sculpted in the act of taunting their French enemies with uplifted kilts. The miniatures are excellent sculptures. There is plenty of detail and the posing is excellent. They really appear to taunting their opponents in the time honoured fashion we have come to expect from the Scots. The uniforms are historically accurate  and if something is not how is should be I'm not aware of what could be missing. I'm really impressed with the detail in the faces of these lads. They are clearly having fun. If I had one criticism it's that the Scot on the left hasn't got a musket. A loose musket that could be placed at his feet or resting against a fence post or wall would have been a nice touch but I'm really just being picky now. Overall these two lads a a must for any serious (or not so serious) collector of a Napoleonic war British army. There was no flash on the miniatures at all. What you see here is exactly as I received them out of the pack. For 3 GBP I think they are very good value for money, (after all, it's not like you will need an entire battalion of these guys).


 They are certainly compatible with Perry Miniatures (my prefered manufacturer of Napoleonic Brits).
How you pose / base them is umm up to you.

 The 3 French Engineers / Sappers are real gems. They consist of one fellow swinging a pick, one creeping forward with some tools and the third, (not pictured sorry) firing his musket, (probably covering his two comrades as they work). These are unusual (but welcomed) miniatures sculpted in the process of doing what engineers / sappers do.  They have helmets and body armour on (a 'must have') if sapping or doing other engineering tasks close to the enemy lines or fortifications. Again the detail is excellent and there was no flash to speak of. At 4.50 GBP they are good value for money. I'm sure you can think of plenty of 'Skirmish' type actions where these guys would be very useful. I'll be basing them for SHARP PRACTICE.

Let's now look at the Hanovarians.
There are eight miniatures in this set, consisting of an Officer, Hornist, one Sharpshooter, (the chap with the fancy epaulette on the right shoulder) and five Jaegers either shooting, dashing forward or loading.
Sculpting and posing is first class. All thedetail is there, and these chaps, like the others, look as if they will paint up a treat.
The subjects are a rather obscure unit, and I'm not sure if any other manufacturer is producing them. 12 GBP for these eigth miniature is I think good value. You'll only need one packet of these lads, and eight is a good number for a skirmish unit. Again, I'm think of SHARP PRACTICE for these guys.
Again, as you can see no flash to speak of.
The Officer (Captain) is a very serious and grim faced chap. He means business.
You can find details on this unit during the '100 Days' HERE





You get four miniatures. A Battalion Surgeon, two Company Surgeons and (I think) a 'Squadron' Surgeon.
Again, sculpting, posing and detail is excellent. The uses for these miniatures is limited only by your imagination, but casualty markers immediately springs to my mind. I particularly like the kneeling chap. He has a sword at his feet, (just the thing for defending himself and his patient). The Surgeon with the apron and saw in hand would look nice in a little diorama at the rear of your army.
Priced at 6 GBP they a good value for money in my humble opinion. 

 I suspect the Doctor with the Bicorn hat on the right here could be painted as a British Surgeon.

All these miniature are very robust. The French Sapper with the pick was of concern, as the pick handle is rather thin, but I was able to bend the pick without fear of it snapping.
All these miniature have real character. They are amoungst some of the best sculpted miniatures I've seen.

Finally I was also sent a French Ammunition wagon \ Cassion. You can see an assembled version at the Westfalian Miniatures website HERE
Assembly is very straight forward and all the parts fit together without any dramas.
This will look the biz indeed as part of my Gun Park directly behind a batter of cannon.
PRICE at time of this review: 8 GBP.

In Summary I would HIGHLY recommend Westfalia Miniatures to you for excellent quality miniatures.
They are certainly a producer of quality miniatures offering those 'unique' miniatures you probably will struggle to find anywhere else, but will add that vital bit of 'character' to your army.
Comments welcomed.
Cheers

Friday, January 18, 2013

SAGA AAR. Anglo Danes defend their Village

 Hi Guys
Another SAGA AAR.
Tonight daughter number 3 (14 years old Hayley) and I had a SAGA battle. Anglo Danes under her command defending a village against Byzantines commanded by yours truly.
My warband consisted of 5 Warriors (two of which have bows, three have spear and shield) and a mounted Hearthguard (Kavallaroi) and finally a mounted Warlord (Strategos).
Hayley was defending with four units, 2 Hearthguard and 2 Warriors and a Warlord.
The scenario dictates I have 6 moves to capture the village. I assume after six move the enemies standing army arrives and my lads must dash off back to their boats or whatever,...
BELOW: DEPLOYMENT


The battle opened with a flurry of arrow shots at the Anglo Dane Hearthguard positioned in the center. Immediate success with two warriors falling to my hail of arrows.
I attacked with the Warriors on both ends of my line and sent my Kavallaroi ff to my left to attempt to attack Hayley's right flank. Hayley countered by moving one of her two Hearthguard off to her right to stall my  Kavallaroi.

The battle between the warriors resulted in much slaughter, but my lads came off worse for wear.
Frustrated with my lack of success with my warriors, (despite so much advantage with fire support from my Warrior Archers) I moved my Strategos off to join the Kavallaroi in an attack on the Anglo Dane Hearthguard on Hayley's right.

The next three turns saw my Kavallaroi bouncing off these Anglo Danes on the flank. At one point I actually feared for my Strategos life!
Hayley's Warlord by contrast was almost single handily frustrating all my efforts to destroy his Warband.
By the time the last turn came around Hayley was reduced to a single Hearthguard and her wounded Warlord in front of the village.
My Strategos and two remaining Kavallaroi were still being faced down by three very annoyed Hearthguard near the low stone walled field on her right flank 'sigh'.
Unable to actually reached the village my only option was to shoot down the Warlord and Hearthguard defending it.
I shot at the Warlord first and he fell beneath the rain of arrows. The Hearthguard however hunkered down behind his shield and survived.
6 turns down, and Hayley held on grimly to score a victory.
With the imminent arrival of the Anglo Dane relief force my warband withdrew.

Another enjoyable game of SAGA.
As usual comments are welcomed.
Cheers.

Sunday, January 6, 2013

Some additional FOG:N observations.


Hi Guys
'Gman' recently asked some questions on a club forum about Field of Glory: Napoleonic (FoG:N) and what I thought of the system.
I thought I might share my response, (and that of my friend Arnaud 'LeGrognard' )


From "Gman"
Hi Scott,

I've heard it said that FoGN is a bit slow to get a game through, how do you find it compares ?

Here in Brisneyland we're looking at what rules set to focus on for Nappies and some of the popular choices are Napoleon at War, Waterloo (GW offshoot ?) and FoG:N .

Do you have any experience with the first two ?

Hoping that FoG:N is easier to pick up on and less brain hurty than FoG Ancients which is pretty much abandoned locally, although I'm not meaning to make pre-judgements at all (in case anyone else wonders !).

Genuinely trying to get an idea of pros and cons.

My reply:

Hi Gman
SLOW? No, defiantly not.
Napoleon At War and Waterloo.? I've Played Nap At War. It's a Division level game. At that level I prefer LASALLE.
Waterloo. Not played though I do have a copy. For what it's worth it looks to much like Warhammer for my liking.
FoG:N is 'wordy' but it rewards the effort put in with an excellent 'Napoleonic' gaming experience IMHO. That said, it's nowhere near as difficult to grasp as some systems I've dealt with. There is an EXCELLENT PowerPoint presentation that you can download that walks you through an entire turn. Highly recommended. I'll try and find it, but I think it's somewhere on the Slitherine FoG-N Forum.



From "LeGrognard"

Hi GMan, 
I posted this in another thread about "FoG:N First Impressions", but have pasted the salient points here: 
Having not played the rules in some months, it was very easy to pick up again, especially with a very knowledgeable referee to assist players (Crabby also has a lot more experience, so really I was the only neophyte).

Rules flow very well, and once you get the sequence down in your head, play moves along very swiftly.

By the end we had a pretty convincing conclusion which I've never seen with any other Corps level system. The only thing that really slowed us down was the occasional query regarding some of the nuances. Since it was a friendly game/learning experience we would all grab our rule book and carefully go through the applicable section so everyone understood. Helped with game play lots, but did slow us down a bit.

Biggest issue I have is with me...not the rules. At Corps level your considerations are far different than at battalion level (duh!) which is where most of us learned Napoleonic wargaming. Once you accept that, then everything about formations, fire, command and combat really does make sense.

The more I play, the more I appreciate these rules. They actually make sense, flow very well and are a joy to play. You can get a very convincing decision in a decent period of gaming once you know what you are doing.

I am certainly enthusiastic about them. Between these rules and "Lasalle" by Sam Mustafa I think I've got my Napoleonic gaming covered. Basing is the same for both systems as well as "BP" and "RtoE" so I can dabble there as well should I choose.

I pretty much agree with everything Arnaud has stated here. For the life of me I can't understand why these rules have not taken off with more people. I understand that they have not taken off in Sydney, but I believe them to be fairly popular here in Melbourne. It's a CORP level game. Once you grasp that it's all good. The rules play quickly.
I've some AARs on my blog:

Battle of Sacille 1809
http://trailape.blogspot.com.au/2012/10/moab-12-sacile-1809-fogn-style.html

Battle of Mockern 1813
http://trailape.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/mockern-october-1813-fog-n-aar.html

and of course our recent battle of Lambsnag on Bunn

http://trailape.blogspot.com.au/2013/01/the-battle-of-lambsnag-on-bunn-fog-n-aar.html

You can find other FoG:N stuff here:
http://trailape.blogspot.com.au/search/label/FOG-N


BELOW: Saxon Infanrty, 1812. "We LOVE FoG:N! (These comments are not paid for by Slitherine)".
I have played 3 VERY large battles with them thus far and got results in relatively short amounts of time (3.5 - 4.5 hours).
The game flows nicely and feels like a Corps level action.
As Arnaud said, between these and 'Lasalle' I've got my Nap gaming covered. I use SHARP PRACTICE for Skirmish and FPGA for ARMY level.

Another question was posed by 'Nick':

My only reservation now is that you and I share a love of AB figures but we seem very different in our approach to rules. You like LaSalle where I think they're a very disappointing set. I need a Command & Control system and a well developed Morale system and some differences between troops when firing (I dont believe Prussian Landwehr ever shot as well as the Old Guard) in my rules for any level of command.
Do these elements exist in FOGN in your opinion?

The C&C system in FoG-N is IMHO excellent. It's nothing like LASALLE in that regard,
(and nor should they). I'm a Divisional Commander in LASALLE. Here in FoG:N I'm commanding a Corp as a minimum.
Shooting? The big difference is between reformed (think French, later war Prussians, etc) and Un-Reformed (think 1806 Prussians). Troop TRAINING has some bearing on shooting. For example:
VETERANS and CONSCRIPTS have re-rolls. Vets re-roll 1s (a Miss) and Conscripts re-roll 6s (a Hit).
Also 'OLD GUARD' will endure hits better than Landwehr.
Remember we have entire REGIMENTS (Brigades) shooting at each other here, not a Battalion of Guard Grenadiers exchanging shots with Landwehr. Things like attachments of Skirmishers and Artillery will impact on your ability to shoot.

In short, I believe so.
FoG:N is NOT FoG:A.

Cheers
Comments Welcomed.

Friday, January 4, 2013

The Battle of Lambsnag on Bunn. A FoG-N AAR

NORTH
WESTEAST
SOUTH
ABOVE: Just as the sun rises and the morning fog lifts, the French army converges on the town of Lambsnag on the river Bunn.
Hi All
Stan and I recently invited our good mate Arnaud up from the 'Big Smoke' of Melbourne to join us for a game of Field Of Glory - Napoleonic. I quickly designed a scenario based 'loosely' on the battle of Albuera. I don't have many Spanish and Portuguese miniatures, so decided on a 'German' setting. The combatants would consist on one side, (commanded by Arnaud) French with some Polish troops and the other side consisting of a mix of  Bavarians and Wurtembergers and British.
The idea is as follows:
It's 1814, and even though the Bavarians and Wurttembergers have defected to the Allies, Napoleon has managed to withdraw from the Battle of Leipzig in good shape. The Allies have brought across from the Low Countries a British Corp to aid their new found allies, (the Bavarians and Wurttembergers). A mixed force of these 'Germans' are now defending the strategically important town of Lambsnag on Bunn. Marshal Victor has been directed by the Emperor to capture the town and the vital bridges and road intersections. Sir General Thomas Graham is commanding the the British Army (of Corps size) and he is hurrying to the aid of the newly raised Bavarian and Wurttembeg units.
The Emperor had intelligence that the town is defended by the recently defecting Bavarians, and suspected that even though they had fought hard against him at Hanau that here (without any Austrians to intimidate them) they might surrender the town.
The battlefield was dominated by the river Bunn running across it. On the eastern side of the river was the town of Lambsnag. A long line of hills ran the length of the eastern side of the Bunn. Further east and behind the hill line lay a small stream; the Dinneroll which ran between the hill line and the Kornchip Heights
Some Scenario Notes:
Here is the Map:
A: French deployment are for French Infantry Divisions.
B: French deployment are for French Cavalry Divisions.
C: Entry point for British Divisions.


The French divisions in Deployment area 'A' setup just outside Musket range, (that's 6 BW in FoG-N terms).
The French player can deploy his troops in any way he sees fit within the deployment areas.
The Bavarians start with the Vanguard Division with one unit in Lambsburg and one unit to the south in any formation he wants. 
The Bavarian Guard Division must be deployed to the north of the towm. 
The German Cavalry Division starts on the Kornchip Heights.
Terrain Notes:
The town of Lambsnag can hold either one LARGE unit or two SMALL units.
For game purposes all the hills are gentle slopes. The River Bunn will cause all troops types to halt as soon as they contact it, but they may then cross it at no penalty. 
The small Dinneroll stream is clear terrain for movement, but does offer some aid in defence.

The mechanism for the arrival of the British is as follows:
A roll of 5 or 6 on a D6 is required for each British division per turn. If the roll is unsuccessful then next turn TWO divisions arrive on a 5 or 6. If that roll fails then THREE divisions arrive on a roll of a 5 -6. I think you can see the pattern here.
If (in the unlikely event NO Brits have arrived by turn three) then they will ALL arrive on turn 4 in any Order of March the Allied Player wishes. Otherwise the Allies contine to roll for reinforcements every turn.

I will refer to the Allied units as Regiments and the French units as Brigades.
Now I've set the scenario in Germany in 1814 with French fighting Bavarians and British, but you could easily use Austrian in 1809 or whatever. Use your imagination, I did.

BELOW: As the morning fog lifts, the Bavarians are confronted with the French army just outside musket range.
The French ORBAT was as follows:
FRENCH and Polish
Troop Type
Name
Size
Elan
Training
1st Corps

CC2 (Skilled)
Victor
1st Division
DC1 (Competent)
Girard
Small
Average
Drilled
Light Infantry
French Light Infantry
Small
Average
Veteran
Line Infantry (reformed)
French Line Infantry (Skirm)
Small
Average
Drilled
Medium Foot Artillery
French 8 pndr Foot Artillery
Small
Average
Drilled
2nd Division
DC2 (Skilled)
Gazan
Light Infantry
French Light Infantry
Small
Average
Drilled
Line Infantry (reformed)
French Line Infantry (Skirm)
Large
Average
Drilled
Medium Foot Artillery
French 8 pndr Foot Artillery
Small
Average
Drilled
3rd Division
DC1 (Competent)
Godinot
Line Infantry (reformed)
French Line Infantry (Skirm)
Large
Average
Drilled
Line Infantry (reformed)
French Line Infantry
Large
Average
Drilled
Line Infantry (reformed)
1st Swiss Line Infantry
Small
Superior
Veteran
Medium Foot Artillery
French 8 pndr Foot Artillery
Small
Average
Drilled
Polish Division
DC1 (Competent)
Dombronski
Line Infantry (reformed)
Duchy of Warsaw Inf (Med Arty)
Large
Average
Veteran
Line Infantry (reformed)
Irish Legion Infantry
Small
Average
Veteran
Dragoon Division
DC1 (Competent)
Latour-Mabourg
Heavy Cavalry
French Dragoons
Small
Average
Veteran
Heavy Cavalry
French Dragoons
Small
Average
Veteran
Light Cavalry (Lancers)
Polish Lancers
Small
Average
Veteran
Horse Artillery
Polish Horse Artillery
Small
Average
Veteran
Light Cavalry Division
DC1 (Competent)
Briche
Light Cavalry
French Chasseurs
Small
Average
Drilled
Horse Artillery
Westphalia Horse Artillery
Small
Average
Drilled



The Allies ORBAT was as follows:
ALLIES  
Troop Type
Name
Size
Elan
Training
CC2 (Skilled)
Graham
2nd Division
DC1 (Competent)
Stewart
Line Infantry (reformed)
British Line (Skirm)
Small
Average
Drilled
Line Infantry (reformed)
British Line
Small
Average
Drilled
Line Infantry (reformed)
British Line (Skirm)
Large
Average
Veteran
4th Division
DC1 (Competent)
Cole
Line Infantry (reformed)
British Line (Skirm)
Small
Average
Veteran
Line Infantry (reformed)
British Line
Large
Average
Drilled
Medium Foot Artillery
British RA 9pndrs
Small
Average
Drilled
5th Division
DC1 (Competent)
Hamilton
Light Infantry
British Lights
Small
Average
Drilled
Light Infantry
Small
Average
Drilled
Line Infantry (reformed)
British Line (Skirm)
Large
Average
Drilled
Light Cavalry
Light  Dragoons
Small
Average
Drilled
Medium Foot Artillery
British RA 6pndrs
Small
Average
Drilled
Cavalry Division
DC2 (Skilled)
Merchant
Impetuous Shock Heavy Cavalry
British Heavy Dragoons
Small
Average
Veteran
Horse Artillery
British Royal Horse Artillery
Small
Average
Drilled
CC1 (Competent)
Beckers
Vanguard Division
DC1 (Competent)
Pappenheim
Light Infantry
1st Bavarian Light Inf
Large
Average
Drilled
Line Infantry (reformed)
11th Bavarian Line Inf
Large
Poor
Drilled
Guard Division
DC1 (Competent)
Holler
Line Infantry (reformed)
Bavarian Guard Inf (Skirm)
Small
Average
Drilled
Line Infantry (reformed)
W├╝rtt Guard Inf (Skirm)
Small
Average
Drilled
Line  Infantry (reformed)
12th Bavarian Reserve Inf
Small
Poor
Conscript
German Cavalry Division
DC1 (Competent)
Dietz
Light Cavalry
Wurttemberg Chevaulegers
Small
Poor
Drilled
Heavy Cavalry
Bavarian Dragoons
Small
Average
Conscript



THE GAME
Turn one. As can be seen from the photos above the allies start with the Bavarian 11th Line Infantry in the town of Lambsnag and the 1st Light infantry to the south of the town. The German Guard Division was deployed on the Hill line to the north of the town. The German cavalry was still asleep in their camp on the Kornchip Heights.
The French were converging on the town under the cover of an early morning fog. As the mist lifted the French were almost withing musketry range. The Masses of French and Polish cavalry were coming down from the north.
The battle opened with the Allies testing to see if any of the British would arrive on turn one.
Good news (a 6 is rolled), Stewart's 2nd Division was marching west on the Lambsnag - Hanau road and were already on the Kornchip Heights.


BELOW: The Bavarian Guard Grenadiers. Average Drilled Line infantry. Nothing special. They have an attachment of Wurttemberg Light Infantry Skirmishers. Newly raised, they won't get the 'Guard' bonus.
BELOW: Wurttemberg Guard Light Infantry. Again, newly raised, we've classed them as Average Drilled LINE infantry with a Skirmisher attachment.
BELOW: Bavarian Reserves. 'Poor Conscripts' LINE infantry.
BELOW: The British 2nd Division arrive just as the German Cavalry division is tumbling out of bed and onto their horses.
The French for their part didn't waste any time and launched an immediate assault on Lambsnag with a Brigade from the 3rd Division.
Try as they might the French could not budge the Bavarians from the town. Victor decided to focus on clearing the southern flank and drove off the large Bavarian Light infantry Regiment away with a massive weight of fire.
ABOVE and BELOWA fire fight erupts!
Whilst the fire fight continued around Lambsnag, the masses of French and Polish cavalry moved to envelope the north of the town. The German cavalry moved off to confront them.

BELOW: The French and Polish cavalry heading north before sweeping towards the Allies northern flank.
BELOW: The Bavarian Light Infantry withdraw (wavering) from the flank of the town.
Turn two, and the Allies rolled to see if more of the British will arrive. Another 6!
Now the British 4th Division under Cole arrives. As they arrive the British 2nd division, (two regiments of Highlanders and a regiment of English Line infantry) move of Kornchip Heights to support the Bavarians in the town. Just in time also, as they are able to provide some 'rear Support' for the town's defenders, and provide some refuge for the retreating Bavarian light infantry.
BELOW: The British 2nd Div moves down off Kornchip Heights as Cole's 4th Division arrives.
BELOW: The Bavarian 11th Infantry Regiment defends Lambsnag as French infantry swarm across the Bunn River to the south of the town.
Turn three. No British arrive this turn (a 3 is rolled).
Again and again the French launch attacks on Lambsnag without any success. As two French Brigades attack from the western side one brigade manages to attack from the northern side.
This only invites the Bavarian Guard Grenadiers to enter the fray however, and the charge down the hill and into the flank of the French brigade. After a short fight the French brigade breaks and routs back across the Bunn.
The French have more success on the south of the town however and those units from the 1st and 2nd Divisions that have crossed the Bunn engage the British 2nd Division units in a fire fight.
The result of which will see the small Highlander Regiment driven back 'Wavering' and the English Regiment is disordered.
The French are in a firm position on the high ground to the south of Lambsnag now. Now Victor looks north.

BELOW: Hot lead and round shot crash into the town, disordering the Bavarians within.
At the top of the picture you can see the large French brigade crossing the Bunn . They then asaulted the town from the north.
BELOW: Polish Lancers and French Dragoons eye the German cavalry across the Bunn river.
BELOW: The Bavarian Guard Grenadiers moments before they chrged down the hill into the exposed flank of the French attacking Lambsnag from the north.
Turn Four. Again, no British arrived this turn (a 1 rolled).
Victor was now getting frustrated with the failed attacks on Lambsnag. He sends an ADC of to order the French and Polish cavalry to attack the German horsemen across the Bunn. At the same time he ordered the Polish, Irish and Swiss Infantry to do what the French seemed incapable of, and that is to drive off some Bavarian and Wurttemberg infantry.
"Those fellows on the hills will do. They don't have any stout stone walls to hide behind"!
With that the Swiss crashed into the Bavarian Guard Grenadiers now downhill after driving off a large French brigade. At the same time the Polish infantry attacked uphill into the Bavarian Reserve infantry and the Irish also charged uphill into the Wurttemburg Guard Light infantry.
The Reservists were already 'wavering' from the fire from the Poles, and they were soon destroyed.
The Swiss and Irish were also victorious, breaking their opposite numbers.
The success didn't end there. The French and Polish cavalry smashed the German cavalry. Not at all surprising being more numerous to the score of 2 to 1, having disordered half the enemy cavalry with supporting fire from their horse artillery and finally being of better quality and 'Elan'!
They German cavalry did manage however to kill General Birche, commander of the French Chasseurs a Chevals brigade.
BELOW: The results of the cavalry battle. All the German cavalry routed from the field.
BELOW: The situation at the end of turn four. The French secure the high ground to the north and south of Lambsnag. The town is still held and a large regiment of Highlanders still provide support, however the allies are very battered with three Regiments of foot broken and two regiments of cavalry routed from the field.
Turn Five: Still no reinforcements for the Allies. The Bavarian Guard Grenadiers rally, (now spent and 'wavering') but the Wurttemberg Guard Lights disperse and a lost for this battle. The turn is spent reorganizing a defence on Kornchip Heights. The French for their part manage to drive off the wavering Highlanders leaving the sole 'Large' Regiment of Scots behind Lambsnag. They also launch yet another assault on the town and again, the attackers, (the Swiss this time) are beaten back. 
 ABOVE: The 'Small' Highland regiment (waving) catches more hot lead. The result sees them retiring quickly up the Kornchip Heights.
BELOW: The French and Polish cavalry advance towards Kornchip Heights. The Irish Infantry link up with their mounted brothers.

 ABOVE: The Bavarian Grenadiers rally after crossing the Dinneroll.
BELOW: The Swiss assault Lambsnag.
Turn Six: HUZZAH!!! A 5 is rolled. More British arrive. This time it's the 5th Division.
The Allies are still holding on grimly but it's looking bad. The French are closing in on three sides. The Allies are pushed back to the foot of the Kornchip Heights. The British 2nd division to the south of Lambsnag are looking particularly vulnerable. All along the battlefield fire fights rage. Finally the Bavarian's in Lambsnag can't take any more punishment and are broken by the massive weight of fire that is brought down on them. 
 ABOVE and BELOW: The Bavarian 11th Regt is finally driven from Lambsnag.
Now the French make what they hope is one last push. The Swiss move into the now vacant Lambsnag. The three French Infantry to the south hurl themselves on the Bavarian Light infantry and the Small English Regiment on their flank. It's 3 V 2 and all are 'disordered' except one of the French Brigades. The fire from the Bavarians and English scores a hit on each on some of the French but they all charge home. The hand to hand combat results in one French Brigade reduced to wavering, but both of the Allied Regiments are routed.
The French also launched their cavalry up the Kornchip Height at the British positions there, but it was at this point the allies concede defeat and decided to withdraw as best they can from the Kornchip Heights.
 ABOVE and BELOW: The French Charge in and receive fire but not enough to stop them. The Allies are broken by the bayonet.
    Another very enjoyable game of FoG:N.
I really like these rules. The ebb and flow is well captured and their is plenty of 'Friction' to frustrate your plans.
As usual. Comments are welcomed.
Cheers